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MHHD : work-diversity-practice

Cultural Competency and Health Workforce Diversity Best Practices

 

Hospitals, Language and Culture: A Snapshot of the Nation, Findings from the National Study of 60 Hospitals (2007)

Those of you looking for best practices related to serving a culturally and linguistically diverse patient population, need to look no further. The Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation recently released a report examining how 60 hospitals across the country manage health care provision to culturally and linguistically diverse patients.; The study shows inconsistent practices not only between hospitals but also within the same facilities. Promising practices were highlighted in the report, with examination of patient-centered communications.  Additionally, an exploration of system-level support will help facilities pondering best approaches to culturally and linguistically responsive care, plan their interventions.

Hard copies of the report can be purchased by calling (630) 792-5957 or downloaded for free at http://www.jointcommission.org/NR/rdonlyres/E64E5E89-5734-4D1D-BB4D-C4ACD4BF8BD3/0/hlc_paper.pdf

 

Practices with Promise: A Collection of Working Solutions for College Opportunity

Practices with Promise is an initiative undertaken by the Campaign for College Opportunity to recognize exemplary efforts that improve college access and success, and to bring these efforts to the attention of policymakers, educators, and the public. The Campaign, along with 15 partner institutions, encouraged California educators, policymakers, or affiliated representatives to submit summaries of working solutions or “practices” that have improved college opportunity for California’s students.

For more information visit http://www.collegecampaign.org/practices/fifteen.html

 

The University Of California Postbaccalaureate Premedical Program(Sept. 2006)

Grumbach, K. Effectiveness of University of California Postbaccalaureate Premedical Programs in Increasing Medical School Matriculation for Minority and Disadvantaged Students. Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), September 6, 2006 – Vol 296, No 9: 1079-1085

Post baccalaureate programs are designed to prepare disadvantaged college students interested in medical education to succeed in applying to medical school. The programs typically prepare the students for the demands of medical education by putting them through a rigorous routine in teaching them test taking, scientific writing, studying methods and interviewing skills. Students that are most in need for enrichment are identified such as those with prior unsuccessful application record.  Five UC system programs took part in the initiative and were evaluated for the period of 1999-2002 academic years. The cohort comprised 265 participants and a control group of 396 students for that period. A retrospective analysis showed that by the year 2005, 67.6% of participants in the initiative and 22.5% of matched controls had matriculated into medical education (p<.001). Post baccalaureate premedical programs appear to be an effective intervention to increase the likelihood of disadvantaged students of entering medical school.

 

The University Of California Postbaccalaureate Premedical Program

Grumbach, K. Effectiveness of University of California Postbaccalaureate Premedical Programs in Increasing Medical School Matriculation for Minority and Disadvantaged Students. Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), September 6, 2006 – Vol 296, No 9: 1079-1085

Article Abstract:

Post baccalaureate programs are designed to prepare disadvantaged college students interested in medical education to succeed in applying to medical school. The programs typically prepare the students for the demands of medical education by putting them through a rigorous routine in teaching them test taking, scientific writing, studying methods and interviewing skills. Students that are most in need for enrichment are identified such as those with prior unsuccessful application record.  Five UC system programs took part in the initiative and were evaluated for the period of 1999-2002 academic years. The cohort comprised 265 participants and a control group of 396 students for that period. A retrospective analysis showed that by the year 2005, 67.6% of participants in the initiative and 22.5% of matched controls had matriculated into medical education (p<.001). Post baccalaureate premedical programs appear to be an effective intervention to increase the likelihood of disadvantaged students of entering medical school.